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In Canada's first space, women will have a breakthrough in 2019.



Ottawa, Ontario – inspiring neuroscientists, astronauts, wildlife photographers, nonprofit founders, public speakers, countless kids for generations – what can Roberta Bonda do?

Canada's first astronaut female astronaut appeared on Tuesday (January 22nd) in front of 500 furiously excited children at the Canadian Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa.

Yesterday was a special day for Bondar, the 27th anniversary of the 1992 STS-42 shuttle space flight. It was even more unique when Bondar and Canadian astronaut Jenni Sidey-Gibbons gave a live broadcast to Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques. On the half-time mission at the International Space Station [Happy New Year from Space! Astronauts Ring in 2019 from Orbit]

2019 is also the 35th anniversary of the sending of astronauts to astronauts officially in October, the anniversary of the founding of Gardeau.

"We have little opportunity to place humans in space," he told Space.com. "Obviously we want more opportunities for women because many people have traveled with the universe several times and many people were for women but I hope someone like Jenni will go to the moon. For the first time, you can become a Canadian. "

The anniversary weighed in with the Sidney-Gibbons hired by the Canadian Space Agency (with Joshua Kutryk) in 2017 and is in the final year of astronaut candidate training. Canadian astronaut Jeremy Hansen oversees the entire astronaut training schedule in 2017, including NASA astronauts.

Sidey-Gibbons said in an interview with Space, "It's a really fun time to join space, but it's unbelievable if you think about Canadian genealogy and history as a space-class country." "Now we're talking about space and we get a goose chunk," he said. "The opportunity ahead of us will be quite good," he said. "We expect commercial crews to come online this year." Maybe we can go back to the moon. How much fun do you have in Canada? "

Bondar is once again developing science at the age of 73, when many settled for retirement. Several times a year, Bondar moves to remote areas in Kenya, Florida and elsewhere to document the population of birds. When Bondar takes a picture of these birds on Earth, Saint-Jacques will record the path of migratory birds in orbit through a partnership supervised by the Roberta Bondar Foundation.

The aim of the research program is to watch birds move from breeding grounds to moving flight paths and non-breeding areas. Much of that path is threatened because ecosystems fall into climate change, human construction and other problems. Photographs of the earth and the universe will come together at a travel exhibition that will be unveiled sometime later this year, when St-Jacques returns from outer space.

Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques (onscreen) talks with astronaut Roberta Bondar (leftmost) and Jenni Sidey-Gibbons (center) on January 22, 2019, talking to students at the International Space Station in Ottawa, Canada.

Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques (onscreen) talks with astronaut Roberta Bondar (leftmost) and Jenni Sidey-Gibbons (center) on January 22, 2019, talking to students at the International Space Station in Ottawa, Canada.

Credit: Elizabeth Howell / Space.com

When Bondar flew to space in 1992, the air was thick with a milestone in Canada. The 125th anniversary of Canada's first colony was unified into the federal government (a pioneer in contemporary Canada). Two Canadians (Bondar and Steve MacLean) became a year of space occupation. The Canadian Space Agency opened its new sparkling headquarters on the outskirts of Montreal that year. Canada also accepted four new astronauts in space programs, including Chris Hadfield (who later led the International Space Station) and Julie Payette (two-time flyer who became Canadian prime minister, governor general).

Bondar visited the museum to begin a new Canadian exhibition at the Space Museum at the end of June 1992. In fact, my parents took me to school. Walking through an exhibit is like seeing how Canada has arrived in space and who is who. Canadarm robotic arms, simulated shuttle payload bays, Canadian satellite and rocket early models, and exciting interactive exhibits in the 1990s (such as rocket sites with button touch lights).

International partners also showed off. The 1992 exhibition included the actual Apollo 7 spacecraft that entered space in 1968 to prepare NASA for future moon exploration. (A loan from Smithsonian and has been in the Frontiers of Flight Museum since 2004. It is also noteworthy that under the model of the spacecraft model and spacecraft, Rand McNally Earth Star Trek "Enterprise. There were these globes in different museums, and the employees told me.

Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques speaks to students on the International Space Station in Ottawa, Canada, on January 22, 2019, in live broadcasts. The right is the figure under the turn complex.

Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques speaks to students on the International Space Station in Ottawa, Canada, on January 22, 2019, in live broadcasts. The right is the figure under the turn complex.

Credit: Elizabeth Howell / Space.com

The memories of the exhibition and memories of 1992 remained with Bondar for decades. "The idea of ​​those who say hello when we get back from the space of an old building is really huge. Now we have new buildings and new astronauts.

You can not see the exhibit. It was dismantled when the museum was closed for two years to remove the asbestos and update the exhibit, but there are still references to spaceflight in the exhibits on the new building. One area includes microscopes and telescopes that celebrate the science of very large and small and show the scale of nature and how we observe it.

There is also space in other museums in the same museum, just a few minutes away from the Canadian Aviation and Space Museum. Today visitors can see the actual space Canadarm robotic arm (not a model that does not shine for children of this generation). You can also see it in other space flight artifacts. In February, a new exhibition will be held to celebrate the role of medicine in space.

Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom On Facebook. Original article from Space.com.


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