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NASA's freely moving robot assistant Bumble passed his first test in space ahead of the housekeeping mission.



NASA's free-flying robot pilot, inspired by the Star Wars droid, passed the first test in space ahead of the ISS's housework mission.

  • NASA's "Astrobees" received its first hardware test on ISS this month.
  • Bots help astronauts monitor equipment and maintain inventory in space.
  • NASA says it will help astronauts carry out missions to the moon and space.
  • Astrobees complements more and more robotic applications in space.

Recent hardware tests on NASA 's robotic assistant, Astrobees, show a voluntary helper of the space treaty, one step closer to reality.

According to NASA, this month's astronaut, Anne McClain, will be working with a robot called the "Bumble", one of the three robotic pilots who launched on the International Space Station (ISS) Hardware tests were conducted.

Scientists hope that Bumble will perform housework, such as monitoring equipment and managing inventories so that NASA can perform more important tasks for mission and experimentation with NASA astronauts.

Scroll down to view the video.

Astrobees is just one of NASA's many robotic applications researching the use of "soft" robotics technology to replace traditional hardware with malleable plastics

Astrobees is just one of NASA's many robotic applications researching the use of "soft" robotics technology to replace traditional hardware with malleable plastics

"Astrobee will demonstrate robotic capabilities that enable and enhance human exploration," said Maria Bualat, AstroBee project manager at NASA's Ames Research Center.

"Performing such experiments in zero gravity will ultimately help develop new hardware and software for future space missions."

Robots based on the small robots in Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith can navigate the environment using cameras that combine propulsive fans with onboard software to avoid obstacles .

Using a small robotic arm, the cube helps to manipulate cargo or help with the experiment.

Anne McClain was able to perform the first hardware test of one of the trio's of the robots on the ISS to support astronauts in various tasks

Anne McClain was able to perform the first hardware test of one of the trio's of the robots on the ISS to support astronauts in various tasks

When the battery is low, the robot can return to its charging station, unlike the Earth-based distress assistant, Rumba.

Astrobees is based on the previous iteration of Robotics Help, SPHERES, the first of three first-generation free-flying robots to participate in a variety of hardware and software experiments deployed on the ISS in 2006.

In the future, NASA hopes that robots like Atrobees can help plan missions for the moon and travel to deep space.

Agencies take a "flexible" approach by developing robots made from malleable plastic that do not use institutional hardware while complementing traditional robots such as Astrobee.

According to NASA, robots fabricated using liquid silicone molds theoretically can expand and contract the plastic chamber and bend along a planet surface, such as a starfish, to explore other planets.

What is the International Space Station?

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $ 100 billion ($ 80 billion) science and engineering laboratory in orbit 250 miles (400 km) from Earth.

It has been permanently deployed since November 2000 by replacing astronauts and crew of astronauts.

Studies conducted on the ISS often require one or more abnormal conditions that are present in low Earth orbit, such as low gravity or oxygen.

ISS research has studied human studies, space medicine, life sciences, physics, astronomy and meteorology.

US space agency NASA spends about $ 3 billion (£ 2.4 billion) annually on space station programs, which is the level of funding approved by the Trump Administration and Congress.

The US House Committee, which oversees NASA, has begun to consider whether to extend the program to more than 2024 years.

Alternatively, money can be used to accelerate the planned human space planes on the Moon and Mars.

To improve their skills, the FDA is exploring how soft robots can work together and collaborate.

Robots similar to NASA's Astrobees, called from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), can help repair and monitor future satellites.

DARPA wants engineers to develop robotic repairers capable of repairing more than 400 satellites in the United States, some of which are located more than 20,000 miles away and are almost impossible to maintain and maintain.

FDA hopes to develop these bots in the next five years.

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