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The scientists say coffee will not get cancer.



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To correct this, researchers used genetic data to find people who naturally drink and drink coffee and use the criteria as a replacement for simple self-report consumption.

"Gene data can provide a much stronger indicator of changing cancer risk if you change your coffee intake," McGregor said.

A popular coffee shop, John Mills, found himself in the alleyway of Brisbane city center.

A popular coffee shop, John Mills, found himself in the alleyway of Brisbane city center.credit:Michelle Smith

These two surveys surveyed 300,000 coffee drinkers for general cancer risk in the UK.

QIMR Berghofer, senior researcher Jue-Sheng Ong, said in this study that there is a risk of developing individual cancers from drinking coffee, and there is no benefit or loss in the morning latte or long black.

"There is some uncertainty about colon cancer in people who drink a lot of coffee and have a slightly lower risk of developing cancer," Mr Wong said.

But conversely, researching data from people with genetic predisposition to drink more coffee has shown that this disease is more at risk. "

Approximately 150 million coffee bags are consumed globally every year, and Australians consume about 2.6 kilograms per person.

Approximately 150 million coffee bags are consumed globally every year, and Australians consume about 2.6 kilograms per person.credit:

Professor McGregor said it is important to judge whether coffee affects people's health, although it may seem frustrating or irrelevant to the general public who wants to know if the study should include a kettle.

"There's a gene for the taste of tea and coffee," he said. "There's a gene that controls how the body treats caffeine."

"So there is a gene for cancer and a gene for coffee consumption, and we need to triangulate whether there is an association."

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Statistics from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show that 46% of Australians drank coffee at least once in 2011-12.

However, there is currently no standardized health consultation agreed on caffeine in Australia.

Approximately 150 million coffee bags are consumed globally every year, and Australians consume about 2.6 kilograms per person.

This study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council International Journal of Epidemiology.

Journalists follow a set of reporting guidelines when writing about medical research. Click here to read them.

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