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Home / canada / Can you chew gum and kill it? Common food additives can lead to colon cancer | life

Can you chew gum and kill it? Common food additives can lead to colon cancer | life



Scientists can not prove that titanium dioxide is dangerous and can not prove to be safe. However, this general food bleach is almost inevitable and manufacturers do not need to mark it as a component.

Titanium dioxide is inferior to the bleach color of sweets, bleach and chewing gum, but new research suggests it can cause colorectal cancer, colitis and other gastrointestinal problems.

"If you have a reason to use titanium dioxide for food, you will say," OK, I'll consider it, "but why? It's purely aesthetic." Says associate professor Wojciech Chrzanowski.

The food bleach is approved for use in Canada and according to a written statement from the Health Canada, the food bleach should be labeled "color" on the ingredient label.

Chrzanowski says these policies are relevant because people do not know how much titanium dioxide is in their food – especially about the effects found in team work.

His team regularly administered the mice to the group and treated titanium dioxide for four weeks with water. The first two groups consumed 2-10 mg / kg body weight, and the third group received 50 mg / kg body weight.

In all cases, titanium dioxide has created a biofilm shield to protect itself after entering the large intestine. This biofilm is associated with colorectal cancer and causes a chemical imbalance in the gut that is swollen in intestinal and other bowel diseases.

Laurence Macia, co-author of the study and associate professor at the University of Sydney, did not prove that the additive is dangerous, but it clearly showed how it affects our bodies.

"I've already had an impact on the immune system in the short term," she says. "Titanium dioxide does not make you sick, but I believe it's preparing your system for the disease. If it's safe, we need proof."

M & M's manufacturer has pledged to remove fake food coloring from products such as titanium dioxide by 2021. Stock photos by 123rf
M & M's manufacturer has pledged to remove fake food coloring from products such as titanium dioxide by 2021. Stock photos by 123rf

According to a 2015 study in the US, some of the most titanium dioxide containing products include Mentos Freshmint Gum, Kool Aid Blue Raspberry, M & M Chocolate Candy and Betty Crocker Whipped Cream Frosting.

The report, which announced that by 2021, will eliminate the coloration of fake foods such as titanium dioxide, the report stressed that many of the tested products did not include bleach on the product label.

Health Canada says that according to the National Post, Canadian producers need to register certain food colorants, such as titanium dioxide, by December 14, 2021, but consumers can buy products without being listed as ingredients. There is.

"If so, let's see that corn starch is labeled as a food ingredient, so if you used titanium dioxide to make corn starch, you do not have to list it," he said. wrote.

Scientists studying food additives are worried about the impact this could have on the vulnerable classes of the child-vulnerable.

According to a study by Queen's University, when a pregnant mouse ingested a conservative amount of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, their babies were born with malformations, and the fruit flies exposed to Drosophila appeared to have infertility problems .

The study says more research is needed on children who are treated on animals but do not reflect their impact on humans, but the immune system is unable to handle the same amount as adults.

Macia says, "I am sorry that all of the new generation of children will be born (titanium dioxide).

"Baby formula contains titanium dioxide, which consumes a huge amount of carbon dioxide from childhood, and you really can not avoid it."

This graph of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in food and personal care products shows how much additives are in the food. The top graph shows the highest concentration of titanium dioxide used in commercial foods. The bottom graph shows the range of titanium dioxide available in each type of product. - donate
This graph of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in food and personal care products shows how much additives are in the food. The top graph shows the highest concentration of titanium dioxide used in commercial foods. The bottom graph shows the range of titanium dioxide available in each type of product. – donate

But the effect is not so clear. The stomach controls the chemicals in the large intestine and everybody has different microorganisms. In other words, some people have a higher tolerance for titanium dioxide and other additives, which could have a negative impact on Russian roulette games.

The Canadian Ministry of Health said it would consider changing the list of approved additives, saying, "New scientific data should be available to point out potential safety issues to consumers."

On the other hand, France is prohibiting titanium dioxide in 2020 because it is not guaranteed to be safe along with other studies related to obesity and diabetes.

After years of blaming genetics for many health patterns, scientists have begun to understand the potential consequences of food additives such as titanium dioxide.

Emma Allen-Vercoe, a professor of molecular cell biology at the University of Guelph, says stomach microbes have 100 times as many genes as the human genome and researchers have missed the microbe for years. Not seeing the gene means that you do not fully understand the effect of the additive on your body.

"If you do not see it, you're missing a lot, and we've completely ignored it," she says.

Macia has been adding human digestive systems adapted to natural organic foods for thousands of years, but now there is no clue as to what it is.

"We are introducing something totally new and our bodies are a little lost," she says. "I think the immune system is trying to respond to a dangerous product, and I do not know that it is unsafe to think of it as titanium dioxide, so I think about why the digestive tract is inflamed."

The warm welcome received by all kinds of additives worldwide has amplified the problem that scientists can not keep.

"I do not know that nanoparticles and other chemical structures are overused in my lifetime so I can do all the experiments," says Virginia Walker, a professor of molecular genetics at Queen's University.

"It's impossible, we have too much."

Macia emphasized that most of the food contains all kinds of additives, while his research and others tend to inspect only one additive on its own. She also says that these additives do not only exist in food, but they live everywhere and can penetrate the environment and contaminate wildlife.

Chrzanowski says his team is developing metaparticles to suppress the effects of additives, Macia hopes the study will bring more changes, including attracting the attention of clinicians and incorporating the correct amount of additives into ingredient labels .

"The real problem is about regulations, and we have no idea how much we eat."

"It is not a big problem to eat processed food, but I do not think it will be acceptable if you eat chronically."

Copyright Postmedia Network Inc., 2019


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