Saturday , February 27 2021

The Malaysian Ministry of Health uses unmanned aircraft to combat mosquitoes.



The Malaysian Ministry of Health plans to expand the use of unmanned aerial vehicles in the state's national health authorities to combat Aedes mosquitoes and prevent dengue. "Unmanned aerial vehicles can be very effective in detecting mosquitoes, especially in inaccessible areas," said Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad, Chief of Datuk Group, who, based on preliminary information, I continued to say I could pursue it.

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Malaysia's Ministry of Health plans to use more unmanned airplanes

"I admit that the use of UAVs to detect Aedes mosquito breeding sites is new, and that devices can be purchased at RM 20,000 per unit," the minister said, following the Malay email.

He assured that the State Department of Health could secure an unmanned aircraft by making additional allocations to the health authorities. He told reporters today to reporters for the Aedes mosquitoes today to run the Madison 2.0 GoToN – Rowan program today.

According to the minister, the decline in dengue fever and deadly dengue cases is due to continued efforts to raise public awareness of the risk of mosquitoes. The Malaysian Ministry of Health promotes preventive measures, including communicating the behavior impact program (combi).

The drones were not used for the first time.

Earlier this year, we reported another situation in Malaysia where unmanned aircraft was used to monitor Malaysian deforestation and track malaria monkeys deep in the Malaysian forest. Especially in Borneo, the deadly 'monkey malaria' has soared, accounting for 69% of all malaria patients in Malaysia. With the aid of an unmanned airplane equipped with an infrared camera, the Monkey Bar Project can better track monkeys through forests and ultimately slow the spread of disease

Tanzania is fighting mosquitoes using a drones.

Drones is working to fight malaria in mosquitoes that carry disease in Zanzibar, Tanzania. Malaria infects 200 million people every year and about 500,000 people die. The disease has long been a problem in Tanzania. One of the latest campaigns to combat malaria, in the southern Saharan region, had millions of bedbugs. The goal was to bite infected people and break the cycle of mosquitoes that are carriers of the disease and infect more people. Bednets have succeeded in reducing the number of people infected from 40% to less than 1% in some parts of Zanzibar. more…

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Photo: Azneal Ishak


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