Wednesday , June 7 2023

Study: "No connection" between insomnia and premature death



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Good news for people with insomnia and lack of sleep will not lead to death.

A new report published in the Sleep Medicine Journal concluded that there is no connection between insomnia and premature death.

Scientists looked at 17 studies involving about 37 million people to collect the results.

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This report is inconsistent with the findings of the National Health Service in the UK, which suggests that people are exposed to obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes, as well as reduced life expectancy due to insomnia.

But for those who suffer from insomnia, the constant anxiety about the relationship between sleep deprivation and short life span is no longer a concern.

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NAVEED KHAN

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Navid says insomnia is getting worse when he and his partner break up earlier this year.

"I do not think that way," said Navid Khan, a high school student. "I do not sleep more than four hours every night.

"I had a very bad night this week. It was a terrible night and I thought I should pass today because I can think about the next day at work."

"I think that if I study only two semesters and sleep well during that time, it will be a good thing. All I have to do is to share time, then do it."

"I swear a little," says Navid.

About 30 people in the UK are considered insomnia, so while reading this report, people close to you are more likely to be affected by sleep deprivation.

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Can you improve your sleep?

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It is not easy to defeat insomnia, but there are things you can do to increase your chances of getting a good night sleep.

The National Health Service (NHS) encourages you to exercise throughout the day and reduce the intake of caffeinated beverages through insomnia.

She also says smoking, eating too much, or drinking too much alcohol can keep you from sleeping well.

Other recommendations include not only trying to sleep at the same time each night, but also writing a captivating list.

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"I feel like a person I can not bear in the worst time of people."

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Al Mara Afghanistan

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Almara said she was very worried about what she could fall asleep and could not sleep.

"I am impatient because I am impatient in the worst situation to hang out with people, because I can not stand it because I lose my temper to anyone," said Almara Abgharian, 29, a writer.

On a good night, Almara says she may take a six hour sleep. But she wakes up all night because of the anxiety and tension that had a negative impact on her life.

"It's more important that you do not have the power to sleep and not to do everyday things," he said. "For example, I'm good with mates and good mental health."

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Asked if the long-term side effects of insomnia are concerned, he said, "I hope it does not continue."

Elmara's sleep deprivation is normal in her daily life, and others agree to insomnia.

"I do not know how you feel when you sleep at night."

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Ryan Ashley

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Ryan said he sleeps for an hour to two hours, but he wakes up every night.

"I feel like I'm used to it," said Ryan Ashley, 23, a musician.

"I was talking to my mother before, and I felt a little bit sad about being suffering, and told me not to be sad, I lived a lifetime and now I am part of my daily life."

"It would be nice to be asleep, but I can not understand it because I do not know how it feels," he says.

Ryan says she spent a fierce childhood of waking up all night and not letting her sleep like Alma.

He does not worry that insomnia will affect his life. "I am confident that I will do something else and my body will be much worse than I can not fall asleep," he says.

The new report, however, can help alleviate concerns about the link between insomnia and premature death, the report said in The British Times, which relates to insomnia and illnesses such as dementia and depression.

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