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Home / unitedkingdom / Dozens of ancient human skulls found during water pipe work | British News

Dozens of ancient human skulls found during water pipe work | British News



About three thousand years ago, dozens of human skeletons were discovered during excavations at Oxfordshire.

Thames Water has made an enchanting discovery of the bloody during a 14.5 million-pound pipeline project that is expected to relieve pressure on rare chalk flows.

Ancient settlements dating back to the Iron Age and Roman times were unearthed by the Archaeological World of Cotswold.

The antlers were used as destruction tools during the neolithic period.
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The antlers were used as destruction tools during the neolithic period.

It is estimated that some of the 26 human remains found at the Childrey Warren site came from a ritual burial site.

Neil Holbrook, CEO of Cotswold Archeology, said, "Childrey Warren's Iron Age site is particularly attractive because it gives a glimpse of the beliefs and myths of people living in Oxfordshire before the Roman conquest.

"Childrey Warren's Iron Age site was particularly appealing because it gave a glimpse of the beliefs and superstitions of people living in Oxfordshire before the Roman conquest.

Iron Age ceramics were discovered.
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Pottery of the Iron Age was found at the site.

"According to other evidence, a buried burial may be related to human sacrifice."

There was also evidence of housewares including dwellings, animal bodies and ceramics, cutting tools and decorative combs.

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Some of the remains may have come from ritual deposits.

The material was carefully removed for forensic testing, allowing utility companies to begin installing 3.7-mile (6-km) pipe sets to supply water to the Thames River Oxfordshire town rather than Letcombe Brook.

Chris Rochfort, Thames Water Environment Manager, said the discovery is "one of the most exciting and interesting."

A bone comb (Late Roman or Anglo Saxon) has been found.
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A bone comb (late Roman or Anglo-Saxon) was found.

"This is a £ 14.5m project that will bring real benefits to the environment by reducing the need to take water from Choke Creek, the world's rare and very important habitat we need to protect, Letcombe Brook.

As a result, future generations will be able to enjoy it in the next few years, and now they can learn about the secret history of the town. "


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